New markets

The very definition of teamwork

This children in this video demonstrate the very definition of teamwork – business can learn a lot from it.

Individual responsibility, coupled with attention to detail and everyone working to a deliver a great outcome = something amazing.

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5 great infographics about digital issues

More and more infographics are becoming the norm to explain complex issues in fun and design rich ways. Today I present you with 5 great infographics that have recently been produced.

How content farms work

PCMag, has put together a stunning inforgraphic on the topic of content farms. Content farms, for those who don’t know, are companies that specifically produce content to appeal to search engines and closely match high frequency search terms. They work, essentially, on the basis that enough pages on one topic – each one slightly different of course – which has a high enough search string will deliver enough pages to make viable amounts of money from advertising revenues.

Highlighting Demand Media, one of the world’s most prolific spam content farms, their business model is actually quite ingenious, as they only produce pages which they estimate will yield positive advertising revenue over a five year period. How many pages could they possibly be creating? According to the infographic, their goal is to produce up to 30,000 per day. Regular readers of this blog will know that Google has changed its algorithms recently to try and bring ‘genuine’ information to the forefront, and lessen the impact of these content farms. But it’s going to be tough. At 1 million articles per year, that’s rough 18 years of New York Times articles.

Get the full size infographic here.

Noob guide to online marketing

Unbounce is helping all prospective online marketers (including those who want to become a little more offait with it) by producing a stunning infographic. Titled “The Noob guide to Online Marketing”, and resembling a dart board with scoring slate undearneath, it truly is a sight to behold. The guide is more detailed than many might have hoped – lest their bosses wonder why they haven’t implemented whole sections of it – but it is a striking piece of graphic design, with the holy-grail of online marketing – the landing page – smack-bang in the middle as it should be. Below, I’ve included the top half of the infographic, for the full version, visit Unbounce’s website, link below.

The full inforgraphic can be seen and downloaded here.

History of Social Media

In November, 2010, Skloog released what many regard to be the quintessential infographic of the year. It was an infographic displaying the history of Social Media. Social Media is being embraced more and more by companies ranging from those who you would expect to be involved – teen and youth focused brands, right through to more ‘suits an’ boots’ organisations such as banks and insurers.

I’ve highlighted, what I consider to be the ‘best’ growth time for social media – 2004 to 2010, however the full infographic is too large to put on this blog. Click on the image below to see it’s full size, or go here for the original which spans from 550BC to 2010. It’s worth noting also that despite this being produced just four months ago – the latest entrant, Google Buzz, has already been withdrawn from the market.

Australian mobile phone usage

One of the hardest things, as an Australian marketer is to find decent, and up-to-date information about Australian mobile phone usage trends. I nearly jumped out of my chair when I found the gem below, which has been cropped, (posted in full here) from mobicity.com.au.

Top mobile trends of 2010

Perhaps a little late to the party, the inforgaphic below highlights some of the ‘big stats’ from 2010. Nothing too surprising here, except perhaps the rise and rise of mobile spending – that is, the actual dollar amount spent through mobile devices. That section of the infographic is below, the full infographic is available here.

The future of marketing is platform agnostic

More than ever, with the constant development of new digital products, marketing and consumerism is increasingly divsersified and companies face a platform agnostic future.

It doesn’t matter how someone gets to your business, what is important is facilitating the opportunity for them to do so. Businesses can’t afford to not be where their current and future customers are. Businesses that aren’t able to convince themselves to open up to as many platforms and access points as is reasonable are doing themselves more harm than good.

Oils ain’t oils

Think about the petroleum industry, particularly petrol stations. Petrol Stations are one of the oldest living examples of a platform agnostic business model. Petrol station owners don’t care what vehicle you turn up in. They don’t care if you have a 30 year old 100cc scooter, a family sedan, a brand new Ferrari or a 10 tonne truck. It simply doesn’t matter to them, as long as you buy fuel (and some snacks) you’re the right customer. To them, the ‘vessel’ in which you’re going to consume the petrol isn’t their concern – they accept you’ve bought the vehicle you’ve chosen for your own reasons.

Carrying this example over, think about the ‘vehicles’ that consumers might use to research, evaluate and consume your company’s products. Consumers might use everything from various mobile phone platforms, the emerging tablet market, social networks and social media, websites, online forms, and all of the other various push and pull channels, such as EDM’s, PPC, outdoor advertising, newspapers, magazines, and retail stores etc. There are more channels than any one business can possibly be constantly across – but that’s OK.

Thankfully, fewer businesses each day are seeing digital, mobile and tablet marketing, as a way to dictate how people engage with them. Sticking exclusively with one or two technologies and expecting consumers to follow suit has all the classic trappings of losing market share and alienating whole market segments. Businesses that see the opportunity to engage with customers no matter what platform choice that customer independently made, will reap more benefits in the short and long term. Few, if any, consumers would purchase their smartphone with all of the companies they use at the moment in mind, while also making sure they’re all compatible, for example.

If your website, or app, is great on an iPhone, but not on Android, or Windows mobile, or iPad, or the Samsung tablet, or the RIM technologies tablet, that needs to be fixed, and quickly. Why? Because if your current, or potential consumers are having a poor experience trying to access you they’re less likely to try again in the future. Worse, they may just switch to a competitor offering a similar product with a more user friendly interface.  Even worse, if they can’t access your business on any of the platforms they’re using, few will bother to tell you – especially if they’re not a loyal customer – and if they are they may well be more critical in their feedback, and may well do it in a public arena, like twitter.

Being across every platform is impossible

Coming back to the example above – petrol stations don’t open up everywhere, they open up in strategically useful places. And the same sort of thinking can be applied to other businesses too.

Businesses don’t have to be across every social network, or every new technology that comes along. But they do need to have individuals that are given the time, and the explicit remit, to explore beyond ‘what’s cool’ and progress to what’s useful and what can be tangibly beneficial to both the company and the consumer. If a large percentage of your current core customer segment are Nokia’s, one might argue that there’s no need to optimise for Smartphones like iPhone or Android. But that ignores the growth potential laying behind your next generation of consumer.

This can be scary, no doubt about it. The leap of faith required to get new social, digital, mobile and tablet initiatives off the ground, where no solid figures exist, can be a hurdle which may be difficult for some to jump over.

After all, if no one else in the industry is doing it, and no one is making money from the social/app/other access product being suggested, how does anyone know it’s going to work? Well sometimes you just have to try these things – toe in the water approach if necessary – to see what happens next.

Yahoo labs discovers what a ‘like’ is worth

Likes and retweets have become big business, and front of mind for many of the world’s top publishers, marketers, commnunity managers and digital product managers. But what exactly is a ‘like’ worth? How many page views do you get? When does a like transfer to a revenue earning click? What does it mean to digital product managers/marketing managers, advertisers and publishers in real terms?

Yury Lifshits from Yahoo labs, has produced a fantastic Vimeo video (below) displaying his extraordinary, and perhaps even unprecedented, workand research into the life of a ‘like’.

Watch the video now, or return after reading some key bullet-pointed findings from the video, below.

The Like Log Study from Yury Lifshits on Vimeo.

  • Stories about Facebook, Apple, Verizon, Groupon, future and infographics are universally popular across technology blogs. Articles about Microsoft, Amazon, Samsung, cloud computing, TV and search see much less engagement.
  • There are around 10 likes per 1000 pageviews (across several websites with public PV numbers). Decay of engagement is extremely sharp, with less than 20% likes happening after the first 24 hours.
  • Lifespan of a story getting likes or retweets is very short. Yury discovered that even the website Engadget, where tech stories, which are more popular prevail – over 80% of likes occured within the first two days. See the image on the right for the average life cycle of a news article via social media likes and retweets.
  • Among the top stories only four are fact-based political news and three are about celebrities. The most common type of hit stories is opinion/analysis. Other common themes include: lifestyle, photo galleries, interactives, humor and odd news.
  • What’s popular depends on the publication, the audience, and naturally enough, what those readers deem to be shareable. Yury discovered that stories about Barach Obama or Wikileaks was particularly popular from NYTimes.com, but stories about Google and China are less popular.

Yury also revealed an absolutely amazing statistic, (emphasis mine):

“At this stage, the average reader of the New York Times (website) only shares one story per year“. Yep, you read that right, the average NYTimes.com reader only shares one story PER YEAR. Only one, every 365 days. That’s incredible.

That means that the NYTimes has a lot of readers, and more importantly, if they could improve that statistic by as little as 10 or 20 percent they would see an absolutely huge increase in traffic on their website, which would be a boon for their revenue.

Yury goes on to draw five conclusions, and the full five are available at the bottom of this page.

I’ve extracted the two that product managers, advertisers and editorial teams need to consider the most:

  • Improve promotion of your best content. According to our measurements, web stories are practically lost 24 hours after publications. Only 20% likes are coming after the first day. This engagement pattern discourages production of “big stories”. To get maximum return on your hits, change your frontpage policy. Best stories should be highly visible. Consider hits-only RSS and twitter feeds, month-in-review / year-in-review programs. TechCrunch Classics is another example of hit promotion. And internal efforts are not enough. Breakout success comes when other media (top TV networks, newspapers and magazines) are picking your story and link back to it.
  • Improve your median story. Sort all your stories by engagement and pick a story right in the middle of the list. This is called a “median”. A median story has less than 50 likes for majority of websites in our study. In other words, every second story takes more effort from a writer than it brings value to the readers. Recently leaked “The AOL Way” reports their median story to have only 1500 pageviews, and they aim to grow it four times. Publishers should ask themselves: Why do we write so many weak stories?

 

There is only one suggestion of Yury’s that I would offer a slightly different perspective on and this is his suggestion and question about producing content that doesn’t work as well, or isn’t as popular. If a publisher only produces content they they know works well, and they know their audience specifically tells them they like now, then only producing that content could box-in that publisher in the future. Further, that content will only serve to reinforce the current consumer behaviour, and will only attract like-minded individuals, thus potentially limiting growth and also risking becoming typecast as a specialist provider of a specific type and genre of content.

Publications need to have a broader range of content for a few reasons:

  • You need broader supporting information as a meta-SEO-framework for ongoing online growth
  • A bigger net catches more fish – and by saying that I mean that even if lesser stories don’t always do so well, the publication doesn’t become known only for doing a limited range of content, and may in-fact initially draw a new user in via the content that isn’t as ‘liked’ by their regular audience. This traffic, in volume, matters significantly over time to archive value and size and referencing potential
  • Dropping less ‘important’ content may be a viable thought-strategy for some businesses, but in the long run, and particularly in technology blogging and publishing we often see that trends quickly shift. If Facebook reporting suddenly became less popular and Tablet reporting rose in popularity does that mean you drop all of it? Not at all, you may pull back a little on the throttle for a while, but that content is still valuable because worldwide there will still be a thirst for that information from niche volumes of readers.
  • Just because it’s not being shared socially, doesn’t mean it isn’t getting read and isn’t useful.

Publishers, industry analysts and those interest in the inner workings of social media should absolutely take note of these findings. A great many questions unfold as a result of reading this research.

Mobile gaming chart of the now

It may be a flooded market place, and yes there are other markets out there, but Apple’s iphone, iPod and iPad markets are alive and well, and by far and away offer the most potential for great profit and distribution opportunity for gaming app producers.

Distimo’s September report provides insights into the seemingly ever growing gaming side of its ‘i’ gadgets.

Replays make all the difference

 

If you’ve ever watched a replay you’ll know exactly how powerful they can be. Whether it’s re-watching English Premier League Football, NFL or Starcraft II, replays give you all the insights possible to improving next time round.

While research and analysis that delivers as close to real time as possible is useful for brands, rarely do management prioritize time to look back at what has happened to date. Like replays, reviews can be incredibly useful learning experiences. However much of the time, reviews are glossed over, with the elephant in the room being any shortfall that may have to be made up in the coming months. Reviews in effect become an opportunity not to diligently and thoroughly review the past, but rather, to talk about the future.

If a campaign has been a spectacular failure, much of the time, the entire campaign is written off, but with proper analysis it may be that just one part of the marketing chain misfired – or failed to fire at all.

Brands that review, and take the time to learn from the information received can, if then used to the company’s benefit in future endeavours, prevent them ending up like the boy above: eyes closed, thinking he’s doing the right thing, hoping that it all works out OK.